Vascular Access

How to stop bloodstream infections before they start

  • Reducing infection risk at all access points

    Every I.V. site presents the potential for infection, dislodgement, skin damage and other complications. These complications can cause patient discomfort and pain, extended hospital stays, additional therapy and surgical intervention - even increased patient mortality.

    3M science has allowed for unique innovations that give you what you need to secure and protect every I.V. catheter—from insertion to removal.

    Our broad portfolio makes it easy for you to choose and use the right products: from transparent barrier films and securement devices, to antimicrobial dressings and disinfecting caps.

    We can help you deliver compassionate care with evidence based solutions to protect patient and clinician safety, help prevent the risks of costly complications and improve patient satisfaction.

  • Stop Bloodstream Infections Before They Start
    Stop Bloodstream Infections Before They Start

    As your partner in protecting patients, we want to do everything in our power to help you achieve your goal of zero bloodstream infections. Learn more about free educational resources and evidence-based products to help you stop bloodstream infections before they start.

  • Real World Data Study
    A real-world study supports the use of CHG dressings

    This large real-world data study further supports the current recommendations for the systematic use of CHG dressings on all catheters of ICU patients.


See how sustained reduction of Catheter Associated Bloodstream Infection was achieved

Dr Philippe Eggimann explains how a sustained 11-year reduction of CABSI was achieved with chlorhexidine dressings.


Sources of vascular associated bloodstream infections

Bloodstream infections can be acquired at the time of insertion or anytime throughout the duration of vascular access. Most happen after insertion.2 Microbes can enter the bloodstream through extraluminal or intraluminal access points. Stay informed about best practices for preventing bloodstream infections.

  • Select green hotspots to learn more

Intraluminal contamination

Results when bacteria migrates through the catheter post insertion, typically via contamination of the lumen through the catheter port.

 

Extraluminal contamination

Results when bacteria originating on the surface of the skin migrates along the outside of the catheter and enters through the insertion point.

Three keys to reducing bloodstream infection risk

  • As your trusted partner in protecting patients, we share your goal of sustaining zero bloodstream infections. And we want to do everything in our power to help you achieve it.

    We believe there are three keys to reaching this goal: people, standards and technology. It’s an effort that requires exacting standards of care, a commitment from the care team to methodically adhere to those standards and technology that adds an additional layer of antimicrobial protection.

  • Three keys of Infection prevention diagram

     


Trained & committed people

Preventing bloodstream infections takes training and commitment. Learn more about 3M resources to help clinicians ensure proper protocols are followed for every patient, every time.

  • Sustained Reduction of CABSI
    Sustained Reduction of CABSI

    Dr Philippe Eggimann shares his experience and evidence on how to reduce CABSI with a care bundle including the use of CHG dressings in a 30 minute presentation.

  • BSI: Addressing Clinical Challenges with Extraluminal Contamination
    BSI: Addressing Clinical Challenges with Extraluminal Contamination

    This module addresses the clinical challenges with catheter maintenance with a focus on extraluminal contamination​.

  • BSI: Addressing Clinical Challenges with Intraluminal Contamination
    BSI: Addressing Clinical Challenges with Intraluminal Contamination

    This module addresses the clinical challenges with catheter maintenance with a focus on intraluminal contamination​.


  • Site Protection, Securement and Skin Integrity: Skin Care Considerations for Vascular Access
    Site Protection, Securement and Skin Integrity: Skin Care Considerations for Vascular Access

    Site protection, securement and skin integrity are the main topics covered including skin care considerations for vascular access.

  • Catheter Types & Anatomical Placement
    Catheter Types & Anatomical Placement

    This 20-30 minute module will provide you with the information on the different types of Vascular Access Devices (VADs), and how they are best used.

  • Complications of Peripheral & Central Lines
    Complications of Peripheral & Central Lines

    This module will provide an overview of some of the more common complications associated with catheters and will discuss methods necessary to prevent, recognise and respond to them should they occur.


Current best practice standards

Many well regarded organisations provide evidence based standards and best practice guidelines for preventing bloodstream infections.

  • National Evidence-Based Guidelines for Preventing Healthcare-Associated Infections
    Epic3: National Evidence-Based Guidelines for Preventing Healthcare-Associated Infections

    Consider the use of a 2% chlorhexidine-impregnated sponge or gel dressing in adult patients with a central venous catheter as a strategy to reduce catheter related bloodstream infection.1

  • NICE Accreditation, Medical technologies guidance (2019)
    NICE Accreditation, Medical technologies guidance (2019)

    The 3M™ Tegaderm™ CHG I.V. Securement Dressing should be considered for use in critically ill adults who need a central venous or arterial catheter in intensive care or high dependency units.2

  • 3M™ Tegaderm™ CHG Dressing 1660 Lifestyle Image
    CDC Industry Guidelines for 3M™ Tegaderm™ CHG

    Chlorhexidine-impregnated dressings with an FDA-cleared label that specifies a clinical indication for reducing catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) or catheter-associated bloodstream infection (CABSI) is recommended to protect the insertion site of short term non-tunnelled central venous catheters for patients aged 18 and older.8


Effective & proven technology

3M’s evidence based products can help you deliver compassionate care, protect patient and clinician safety, help prevent the risks of costly complications and improve patient satisfaction.



References

  • 1. Loveday H.P et al epic3: revised recommendation for intravenous catheter and catheter site care. Journal of Hospital Infection (Guideline addendum) 92 (2016) 346-348, 2016

    2. Medical technologies guidance [MTG25] Published date: September 2019. The 3M Tegaderm CHG IV securement dressing for central venous and arterial catheter insertion sites www.nice.org.uk/guidance/mtg25

    3. Timsit JF, Mimoz O, Mourvillier B, Souweine B, Garrouste-Orgeas M et al. Randomised controlled trial of chlorhexidine dressing and highly adhesive dressing for preventing CRBSIs in critically ill adults, Am J Resp Crit Care Med. 2012: 186(12): 1272-1278.

    4. Trautmann M, Saatkamp J, Cost-effectiveness analysis of an antimicrobial transparent dressing for catheter insertion sites on intensive care units; Hyg Med 2016:41(5):D65-70

    5. Karpanen TJ, Casey AL, Das I, Whitehouse T, Nightingale P, Elliott TSJ. Transparent film intravenous line dressing incorporating a chlorhexidine gluconate gel pad: A clinical staff evaluation. J Assoc Vasc Access. 2016:September:21(3):133–138.

    6. Kohan CA, Boyce JM. A different experience with two different chlorhexidine gluconate dressings for use on central venous devices. Poster presented at Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC) and published in Am J Infect Control. 2013;41(6):S142–S143.

    7. Eggimann P, Pagani JL, Dupuis-Lozeron E, et al. Sustained reduction of catheter associated bloodstream infections with enhancement of catheter bundle by chlorhexidine dressings over 11 years. Intensive Care Med. (2019) 45:823-833.

    8. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2017 Recommendations on the use of chlorhexidine-impregnated dressings for prevention of intravascular catheter-related infections: An update to the 2011 guidelines for the prevention of intravascular catheter-related infections from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Division of Healthcare Quality and Promotion.
    Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/infectioncontrol/guidelines/bsi/c-i-dressings/


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